Moving Wall

The Vietnam Moving Wall was in Natick, Massachusetts from June 9 - 12, 2011.



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Spitz: Reflections on the Wall
By Julia Spitz
MetroWest Daily News
Jun 11, 2011


NATICK - John H. Anderson and your own image reflect back at you.

Ahead, there's a boy, probably 12 or 13, with hair halfway down his back. Next to him is a Wilson Middle School classmate with a crew cut.

You see the names grow from a single line to a crescendo that fills the middle black panels, then taper back down as you head east across the West Street field.

Read more...

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Video: Natick Welcomes Vietnam Moving Wall
The town held an opening ceremony for the arrival of the Vietnam Moving Wall on Thursday.
By Alissa Letkowski
Natick Patch
June 10, 2011

The roaring blasts heard over the Vietnam Moving Wall opening ceremony Thursday were not shots from the scheduled 21- gun salute, but rather cracks of lightning, which pushed the event from the field where the wall currently sits to the Natick High School auditorium.

Read more...

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Veterans, friends, family pay tribute at Vietnam Moving Wall
June 10, 2011
By Jaclyn Reiss, Globe Correspondent, Globe Staff

Under a hot afternoon sun, friends, neighbors and relatives of Vietnam War veterans who gave their lives 40 years ago paid tribute at the Vietnam Moving Wall in Natick.

Spanning nearly the whole width of the Natick High School’s soccer field border, the dark granite monument is inscribed with the names of 58,000 fallen veterans. A handful of mostly older people milled about slowly, reading names to themselves or examining the 11 wreaths representing Natick lives claimed.

Moving Wall committee members and Natick High graduates Paul Carew and Warren Griffin sat under a tent, took a break from the day’s humid heat and reminisced about the deceased soldiers they once called friends, classmates, and neighbors.

“One of the girls I went out with in high school, her brother’s on there,” Carew said.

Carew also recalled a classmate’s name from his schoolwide athletic fame.

“Keith Flumere was a star athlete in high school, and graduated in 1966,” Carew said.

Griffin, who graduated with the deceased Richard Rinehart in 1967, said he was happy to see Rinehart’s sister from Florida in last night’s ceremony audience.

“We all graduated together,” Griffin said. “I was looking at her in the audience when I was up on stage last night. She said she went through a couple of Kleenex during the ceremony. It’s been 40 years since her brother passed, but it still hurts.”

Carew said the memorial coming to Natick could help people who lost friends and family in the war move on.

“It’s good for the lifelong healing process,” he said. “When you lose a loved one in a war, or in any trauma, it’s a long healing process. It’s also important to bring the Wall here to Natick to educate the young folks.”

Both Carew and Griffin emphasized the importance of teaching the Vietnam War in public schools, since the unpopular war earned veterans disrespect and loathing from citizens on the home front.

“When we came home, there was disrespect — not a lack of respect, or indifference, but disrespect,” Griffin said. “We were spit on and called ’baby-killers.’”

When Carew asked eighth graders about their perception of the war, he described what one 13-year-old said.

“This kid raised his hand and said his perception was that we were baby-killers,” Carew said. “That’s what they taught them. They don’t look at the battles or anything like that, but at the Mai Lais of the war.”

Ron Hopkins, who was visiting the memorial from Newport, Maine, said he saw a veteran looking at the names and crying earlier in the day over lost friends.

I feel all choked up and I didn’t know anyone who died, so I can only imagine how he feels,” Hopkins said. “When I came down to look at it, he was wiping the tears off his face.”

Eddie Donahue, who graduated from Wellesley High School in 1967, came to pay tribute to his friend, David Ouellet.

“I know probably about 10 people on the wall,” Donahue, who served in the war, said.

Framingham resident Dina Tucceri said her husband James, who has not cried in years, had tears streaming down his face during last night’s ceremony when the town honored his uncle, Eldon Tozer.

“They went through each of the 11 Natick soldiers, and how they died,” Tucceri said. “Eldon was the oldest at 35 years old, and had been in the service for quite some time. He died from a bomb from the other side.”

When Tozer’s body had to be identified at the morgue, none of his immediate family members could muster the strength to take in the image of their disfigured son and brother. So James Tucceri stepped up to the plate.

“Mu husband, at 19 years old, had to identify the body,” Tucceri said. “I asked if Eldon still had a face, and my husband said he only had half a face.”

All in all, today’s Wall visitors said they were happy that the veterans were getting the recognition they deserved, and looked ahead at giving respect for future War on Terror veterans.

“When we as young veterans were getting out, the old World War II veterans didn’t stick up for us,” Griffin said. “Now here I am, an old guy, and I’m going to stick up for them.

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A moving tribute arrives as Natick honors fallen
Visitors stream past the Vietnam Moving Wall in Natick.
By Ian B. Murphy/Daily News staff
The MetroWest Daily News
Posted Jun 10, 2011 @ 12:00 AM

NATICK - Chased indoors by thunderstorms, the community gathered in the Natick High School auditorium last night to remember 11 local men as part of a ceremony marking the arrival of the Vietnam Moving Wall.

Wreaths commemorating the 11 soldiers, sailors and airmen from Natick killed during the Vietnam War lined the front of the Healy Auditorium stage, decked with red, white and blue ribbons. As Martin Grady read each name aloud, an active-duty member of the same service branch as the fallen warrior took position behind the wreath and saluted.

Family and friends stood silently in remembrance.

After all 11 soldiers were honored, attendees stood as Taps was played, the solemn notes ringing out across the auditorium as thunder boomed outside.

Knowing the traveling half-sized replica of the Washington wall was just down the street bearing more than 58,000 names of those killed in Vietnam made the ceremony poignant.

"When the wall is gone, we'll always remember it," said Ed Jolley, chairman of the Natick Moving Wall Committee. "When you touch it, the feelings and the emotion you feel, it's something you'll never forget."

The wall, on the high school soccer field on West Street, is open to the public 24 hours a day until Sunday's 5 p.m. closing ceremony.

Ceremonies honoring the fallen will be held each day this weekend. For more information about the wall itself, Natick's 11 fallen soldiers or a schedule of events, visit movingwallnatick.org.

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MEDIA GALLERY: Volunteers Setup Vietnam Moving Wall
Volunteers are spending the day Thursday, setting up the Vietnam Moving Wall. Opening ceremonies begin tonight at 6 p.m.
By Alissa Letkowski, June 9, 2011

Volunteers waited for thunderstorms to pass and endured the heat Thursday to set up the Vietnam Memorial Wall, which just arrived in Natick and will remain on the Natick High School practice soccer field until June 12.

Volunteer Cary Holmes said since it was announced that the wall was coming to town, he received an outpour of people in town looking to donate their time. Holmes said there were roughly 270 people who volunteered to read the names of the 58,400 men and women who gave their lives during the Vietnam War. The names were recorded on tape on Natick Pegasus and will be on file for years to come as a part of Natick's oral history. Among the volunteers who read were WCVB TV personalities Susan Wornick and Harvey Leonard, town officials, war veterans, eight Natick High School students, a 9-year-old child and other members of the community.

The opening ceremony begins at 6 p.m. Thursday at the wall.

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Moving Wall arrives in Natick

By Maureen Sullivan
The MetroWest Daily News
Posted Jun 09, 2011


After a two-hour delay due to morning thunderstorms on Thursday, the Moving Wall, a half-size replica of the Vietnam Memorial, made its way to the soccer field at Natick High School on West Street.

Volunteers from the Moving Wall Committee, including several Vietnam veterans, helped with the installation of the Wall's base and with the landscaping (courtesy of Brochu Bros. of Natick) before removing the panels for installation.

Opening ceremonies are scheduled for 6 p.m. today. In case of severe weather, the ceremonies will be moved to the high school auditorium.

Visit www.movingwallnatick.org for details.

In tribute to the arrival of the Moving Wall in town, the Morse Institute Library on East Central Street is running interviews of Vietnam veterans who have taken part in the Natick Veterans Oral History Project. There's a TV and DVD player in the main entrance, so anyone can stop by during library hours on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday and watch.

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Vietnam Moving Wall in Natick today
By Ian B. Murphy
The MetroWest Daily News
June 9, 2011

NATICK - The opening ceremony for the Vietnam Moving Wall is today at 6 p.m. at the Natick High School soccer field on West Street.

The ceremony will honor the 11 men from Natick who died during the Vietnam War, with the town and active duty service members presenting wreaths to the friends and family of the fallen.

Selectman Josh Ostroff said anyone interested in volunteering today or any time through Sunday afternoon, when the wall is packed away, should visit movingwallnatick.org.

A complete schedule of events is also available at the website.

The Moving Wall is a traveling, half-size replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. It was built in 1984, two years after the original memorial opened, and contains all the names inscribed on the original wall. It will be open to the public 24 hours a day while in Natick.

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Town searching for family of Natick's fallen
The Moving Wall, which came to Waltham in 2005, will be arriving in Natick in June.
By Ian B. Murphy/Daily News staff
The MetroWest Daily News
May 27, 2011

NATICK - Organizers for the Moving Wall's visit to town next month are still searching for relatives of three Natick residents killed in action in Vietnam to take part in the ceremony honoring 11 fallen men.

The town wants to invite relatives of Army Staff Sgt. Dennis Poteat, Air Force Lt. Roger Brown and Navy Chief Eldon Tozer to be a part of a ceremony Thursday, June 9, with loved ones of other residents killed in the war.

"It's a wonderful opportunity for family members of these sons of Natick to be acknowledged and to hear the gratitude of the community for the sacrifice for these soldiers, sailors and airmen," said Josh Ostroff, a selectman helping with the search.

Marty Grady, the Moving Wall committee member leading the search, said none of the three soldiers was originally from Natick. They either lived in town during their enlistment or called the town home at the time of their death.

Grady said the town does have a few leads.

Originally from Marion, N.C., Poteat was working at Natick Labs when he agreed to go back to Vietnam for another tour of duty. He may have been married to a woman named Brenda.

Brown was originally from Wayland, graduated from Wayland High School in 1963 and lived at 21 Davelin Road in Wayland. His father's name was Warren.

Tozer came from Cullen's Brook, Quebec, and had four children: Janet, Donna, David and Gwendyl.

Grady and Ostroff said the town has had contact with a few relatives, but none could come to the wreath ceremony or put the town in touch with other family.

"We want to present a wreath to each one of these families," Grady said. "We'd like to have someone there from the family, but if we can't find anyone, we'll find a friend or someone else. But we need to know. We don't want anyone to feel as if they've been left out because we didn't notify them.

"We need any contacts at all, no matter how far-fetched it is.

Anyone with leads for the searchers should go to movingwallnatick.org for contact information for Moving Wall committee members.

During the opening ceremony, the town hopes to pair a service member from the same branch with the family member or friend of each soldier, sailor or airman killed in Vietnam.

The family of Lt. Allen Loane of the Marine Corps can't come to the event, so friends of Loane's from the Natick High Class of 1959 will receive the wreath.

The other seven Natick residents killed in Vietnam were Lt. Arthur Wright III, Marine Corps; Seaman Thomas Donovan, Navy; Lance Cpl. Dennis Higgins, Marine Corps; Cpl. Keith Flumere, Marine Corps; Pvt. John Madden Jr., Army; Spc. Kevin Lynch, Army; and Cpl. Richard Rinehart, Army.

The Moving Wall was built in 1984, two years after the original memorial opened in Washington, D.C. The half-sized replica has all the names that are inscribed on the original wall, and it is set up to mimic the east-west orientation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

Natick's Veterans Service Council has worked toward bringing the Moving Wall to town since September 2009. It will be placed on the high school soccer fields on West Street.

The opening ceremony is scheduled for 6 p.m. Thursday, June 9, and the wall will be open to the public 24 hours a day until the afternoon of June 12. Dozens of volunteers have created an audio recording of the names of each person on the wall, which will be played on a loop.

This will be the last time the Moving Wall will be in Massachusetts this year.

Volunteers have been raising money and coordinating the effort since the dates were confirmed.

"It's really great that the whole town of Natick is behind this," Grady said. "I just can't say enough about the committee, and a lot of them non-veterans. Without them, we couldn't do it."

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Natick preparing for Vietnam Moving Wall
By Ian B. Murphy/Daily News staff
The MetroWest Daily News
May 23, 2011

NATICK - With less than a month until the Vietnam Moving Wall arrives in Natick, the community is coming together to make sure the town's tribute to the war's veterans is a success.

Dozens of residents, businesses and organizations have chipped in for the cause. Home Depot has donated all the lumber required for the wall's platform, and the local carpenter and electrician unions are donating time to set it up. Hampton Inn is putting up the wall's two traveling custodians for free, and Dunkin' Donuts will donate coffee for volunteers manning the wall at the high school soccer field on West Street, June 9-12.

John Connolly, a former selectman and member of the Moving Wall committee, has printed T-shirts for the wall as a fundraiser and will be sold for $15 at the Farmers Market, Jones Drug in Natick Center and at other events around town.

"It's been amazing to see the big efforts and the little efforts," said Connolly. "We've got some nice big contributions to single dollars, and they've been from elementary school children to World War II vets."

The Moving Wall is a traveling, half-size replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. It was built in 1984, two years after the original memorial opened, and it contains all the names inscribed on the original wall. While it is in Natick, it will be open to the public 24 hours a day.

Ed Jolley, chairman of the wall committee, said there are around 25 dedicated volunteers who have taken on the project since Natick requested to bring the wall to town two years ago. Jolley, who is from Framingham, said the way the town government and community have backed the project has been special.

"The people here are fantastic," he said. "They back you to the hilt. They jump right out there for you, and it's nice to see that."

The Fire Department is donating wreaths to honor the 11 Natick residents who died in the Vietnam War, and the town tied its yearly Boston Marathon permits to fundraising for the cause.

State Rep. David Linsky, D-Natick, who is going to speak at the opening ceremony of the wall on June 9 at 6 p.m., attached an earmark to the state budget to raise money for the cause.

"I was successful in putting $15,000 into a version of a budget that the House passed a couple of weeks ago that would defray some of the costs for the Moving Wall in Natick," Linsky said. "I know that Sens. (Karen) Spilka and (Richard) Ross will be attempting to put the same earmarked funds into the senate version of the budget, and I hope they are successful.

Jolley said Natick schools are going to bring children to see the wall so they can learn about the Vietnam War.

"War is an awful thing," he said. "I don't believe in shoving it down their throats. But I think if they can at least get an idea of what (the Vietnam War) was, then you can say 'This is what the price of freedom is. This is what freedom is all about."'

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Natick Reads"March is Natick Reads month. This year's theme is Natick Reads Explores Vietnam in recognition of the arrival of the Moving Wall in Natick on June 9. Complete information is at http://bit.ly/i974eg

Natick Reads is a collaboration of the Morse Institute and the Bacon Free Libraries and is supported by the Friends of the Morse Institute and the Friends of the Bacon Free Library."

 

 

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Veterans Services United
FEBRUARY 25, 2011
Moving Wall & Other News

The Moving Wall is a half-size replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial which is located in Washington, D.C. For the past 20 years, it has been touring across the nation, giving people everywhere a chance to pay homage to the brave soldiers who fought in the Vietnam War. From June 9-12, 2011, the Moving Wall will be in Natick, MA.

I encourage everyone to visit the Moving Wall while it stops in Natick. For more information, please visit the Moving Wall – Natick website.

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Marathon spots still available from Natick
By Ian B. Murphy/Daily News staff
The MetroWest Daily News
Posted Feb 25, 2011

NATICK - The town is still searching for runners interested in a number for the Boston Marathon who are willing to raise $2,500 for local charities.

Natick has five runner bibs left, which officials say is surprising after registration for the race sold out in record time last fall.

"We're really surprised that these haven't gone faster, because especially this year, the right to have a number to run, it is a hot commodity," Town Administrator Martha White said. "People should contact us as soon as possible so they'll have the best opportunity to train, and if they're interested they can get one of these few remaining permits."

White said the town's late jump on offering the bibs is likely behind the lagging interest. Natick finalized its plan to distribute the bibs in mid-January.

"It was a lot of pieces to put together in a tight time frame," White said.

The town was one of four along the race route to receive 20 bibs from the sponsor, the Boston Athletic Association, along with Framingham, Ashland and Wellesley. The sponsor previously gave bibs directly to fire and police departments along the route, but this year they were distributed to town managers and administrators.

Natick divided its permits between its fire and police departments and then made eight available for charity runners willing to give a minimum donation of $2,500 to either Moving Wall Natick or the Healthy Pantry Initiative.

The former will bring a replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., to the Natick High soccer field on West Street from June 9 to June 12. The latter is a collaboration between the Natick Service Council and Natick Community Organic Farm.

In Ashland, the town worked with a resident to distribute the 20 bibs to active runners. Runners will donate at least $2,500 to special town programs and social services, according to the town's website. In Framingham, the town split bibs among the fire and police departments, and then each of the five selectmen and the town manager gave bibs to runners raising money for local charities.

Wellesley gave four bibs to Children's Hospital in Boston and six to town employees interested in running. It opened the remaining 10 to the public, seeking $2,500 in donations for the Fund for Wellesley, a local charity that offers grants and funds programs for the community.

Chris Ketchen, deputy director of general government, said Wellesley set its program in motion in early January. It had one permit left after a runner dropped out and is concerned about the time left for potential runners to train.

"Running the Marathon is big commitment, in terms of the training that's involved," Ketchen said. "Next year, we'll have enough lead time to get the word out faster."

(Ian B. Murphy can be reached at 508-626-3964 or imurphy@cnc.com.)

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Boston Marathon Numbers Available in Natick!
Town Seeks Local Runners to Raise Funds for Two Natick Charities

UPDATED FEBRUARY 8, 2011
Due to an insufficient number of applications, the Town of Natick is extending the deadline for submission of Letters of Interest from prospective runners. Applications will be accepted on a first-come-first-served basis.

The Town has been provided 20 “invitational” applications by the Boston Athletic Association (“BAA”) and is pleased to offer local residents and charity runners with an opportunity to compete in the 115th Boston Marathon® on April 18, 2011. These invitational entries will allow Natick to raise funds for worthy community causes.

On Monday, January 10th, the Natick Board of Selectmen endorsed Town Administrator Martha White’s proposal to issue several of the permits to members of the Natick Police Department who run the Boston Marathon®, issue 5-6 of the permits to the Natick Fire Department to be donated to The Michael Carter Lisnow Respite Center in Hopkinton – an organization long supported by Natick Firefighters, and the balance of Natick’s invitational entries being used to support the following causes:

• Bringing the Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial Moving Wall™ to Natick this summer www.movingwallnatick.org
• The Healthy Pantry Initiative, a collaboration between the Natick Community Organic Farm www.natickfarm.org and the Natick Service Council www.natickservicecouncil.org
Both of these charities will enable runners to raise tax-deductible donations and the Town of Natick will work with the selected runners to enable the processing of online (credit card) donations.

Details:

• The Marathon entry fee is $300, to be paid by the runner
• The minimum fundraising contribution is $2,500. Runners must guarantee this minimum fundraising level with a credit card but, of course, higher fundraising levels are encouraged.
• All prospective runners must submit a Letter of Interest. Letters will be accepted on a first-come-first-served basis, so to guarantee an entry, get your Letter of Interest in as soon as possible. Letters may be hand delivered to the Town Administrator’s office in Natick Town Hall, 2nd floor or submitted by email to Maureen Fleming at mfleming@natickma.org.

Letters of interest must include the runner’s name, address and phone number, designation of the charity for which funds will be raised, and indication of the amount of funds you commit to raising for the charity.
The Town Administrator’s office can be reached at 508-647-6410.

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Boston Marathon Runners to Raise Funds for Natick Charities
Runners in the Boston Marathon can help raise money for the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial Moving Wall and the Healthy Pantry Initiative.
By Alissa Letkowski
February 1, 2011

If you've ever considered running in the Boston Marathon for a challenge and for your health, you may have another reason to strap on those running shoes this year.

The Boston Athletic Association has issued 20 "invitational" applications to towns along the marathon route to thank them for their cooperation during the competition, according to a press release. With the invitations, towns will be able to raise money for charities in their community.

On Jan. 10, the Board of Selectmen supported Town Administrator Martha White's suggestion to give five or six of the invitations to the Natick Fire Department, who in turn will donate the permits to the Michael Carter Lisnow Respite Center in Hopkinton.

The remaining permits will support the Vietnam Veterans' Memorial Moving Wall's trip to Natick this summer and the Healthy Pantry Initiative run by the Natick Community Organic Farm and the Natick Service Council. Runners can raise tax-deductible donations to these charities. The town will reportedly help selected runners process credit card donations online.

Runners will pay a $300 entry fee, with a minimum of $2,500 contributed to the fundraiser. The amount must be guaranteed by the runners' credit car.

Feb. 4 at 5 p.m. is the deadline to sumbit a letter of interest to the Town Administrator's office in Town Hall on the second floor. Prospective runners may also e-mail their letters of interest to Maureen Fleming at mfleming@natickma.org. Letters should include the runner's name, address, phone number, charity and amount of money the runner commits to raise.

The first five selections will be given to those committing to raise the most for their charities. The remaining five or so permits will be for Natick residents only and will be chosen by lottery drawing on Feb. 7 at 5:30 p.m.

Call the Town Administrator's office at 508-647-6410 if you have any questions.

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Natick to host Vietnam memorial in June
By Ian B. Murphy/Daily News staff
The MetroWest Daily News
Feb 01, 2011

NATICK — The Moving Wall, a traveling half-size replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C., is coming to Natick from June 9 to 12.

The memorial will sit on the high school's practice soccer field on West Street, and the town will host opening and closing ceremonies honoring the 11 Natick men who gave their lives during the war.

Paul Carew, the town's director of veterans services, said seeing the names of loved ones on the memorial is part of an important healing process for families and friends of the dead servicemen and women who have not been able to travel to the nation's capital to see the original.

"Once they get to the wall and see their person's name there, it does bring a little bit of healing to them," said Carew. "The comradeship of having other people there, the veterans and the families of the other deceased veterans, it's part of the healing process."

Since September 2009, Natick's Veterans Service Council has worked to bring The Moving Wall to town. The dates are earlier than the town had requested, so the site of the memorial has been moved from Elm Bank in South Natick to the fields on West Street.

The opening ceremony will be held during the afternoon on Thursday, June 9, and the memorial will remain open 24 hours a day until closing ceremonies on Sunday.

Now that Natick is a confirmed destination for the memorial, the council will turn its attention to raising $25,000 to $30,000 to beautify the site and create memorabilia for the event.

Ed Jolley, Veterans Service Council president, said his goal is to keep costs down and use volunteers.

"Everybody can participate," Jolley said. "We need volunteers to take on different parts, security, food and maintaining the grounds."

Natick recently opened up Boston Marathon race permits to runners willing to donate at least $2,500 to either The Moving Wall effort or the Healthy Pantry Initiative, a collaboration between the Natick Service Council and the Natick Community Organic Farm.

"That will be great to make some money right there," Jolley said.

The Moving Wall was built in 1984, two years after the original memorial opened in Washington. It contains all 58,000-plus names of those who died in the war or remain missing inscribed on the original wall, and is set up to mimic the East-West orientation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.

For more information about Natick's plans for The Moving Wall and ways to donate or volunteer, visit movingwallnatick.org.

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Natick offers Marathon numbers to charity runners
By Ian B. Murphy/Daily News staff
The MetroWest Daily News
Jan 31, 2011

NATICK — Runners shut out of this year's Boston Marathon can receive a race number from the town by raising money for one of two town charities.

This year the Boston Athletic Association, which oversees the marathon, gave 20 permits to each town along the race route. Town Administrator Martha White has reserved between 10 and 12 permits for the town's fire and police departments but has opened the remaining permits to the public.

"The idea is to raise monies for organizations that are affiliated with the town government in some way, to help the town," White said. "But we want them to be not-for-profit organizations, so when the runners are raising money they can tell their donors this is tax-deductible money."

Interested runners must guarantee with a credit card at least $2,500 worth of donations to either one or both of the two designated town charities: bringing the Vietnam Veterans' Memorial Moving Wall to Natick, or the Healthy Pantry Initiative, a collaboration between the Natick Service Council and the Natick Community Organic Farm.

The five runners with the highest total of guaranteed donations automatically win permits. The remaining permits will be awarded to Natick residents through a lottery drawing.

If a runner does not receive a permit, they will not be obligated to donate to the charities, and their donors will not be expected to contribute, since the runner will not have a Marathon berth. Anyone can enter for the high bid spots, but only Natick residents will be entered in the lottery. All runners must pay the $300 entry fee.

The deadline for runners to submit a letter of interest to White's office is 5 p.m. this Friday.

The Fire Department will continue to donate its runners' permits to the Michael Carter Lisnow Respite Center in Hopkinton, which provides support for disabled children and their families.

Dan Hartwell, president of the local fire union, said the firefighters have been donating their permits to the center since 2004 for the Jerry and Michael Stanhope Scholarship. Named for a Natick firefighter and his developmentally disabled son, the pair was an early part of the center's family and died of cancer within a year of each other.

"We wanted to keep their memory alive, so the union started a scholarship to the respite center," Hartwell said. "After probably a year or two of doing that, we were able to expand it and get police departments and fire departments along the Marathon route to donate their Marathon permits. What started out as a $2,000 scholarship, last year was a $78,000 scholarship."

White said she was hesitant to continue that commitment at first, since the charity wasn't local to Natick, but once Hartwell explained how much it meant to the fire department to continue the relationship, she quickly changed her mind.

"She was all for it," Hartwell said.

For more information on the bid process and lottery, call White's office at 508-647-6410. To read about the two town charities, visit movingwallnatick.org, or natickservicecouncil.org.

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Boston Marathon Numbers Available in Natick! (pdf)
Town Seeks Local Runners to Raise Funds for Two Natick Charities
January 25, 2011

The Town of Natick is pleased to offer local residents and charity runners with an opportunity to compete in the 115th Boston Marathon® on April 18, 2011. This year, the Boston Athletic Association (“BAA”) released 20 “invitational” applications to the towns along the Boston Marathon route, as a thank you for the coordination and cooperation of these communities during the Boston Marathon®. These invitational entries will allow towns along the route to raise funds for worthy community causes. These numbers are highly coveted by those who wish to run as it is limited to a certain number of runners and sold out at a record pace this year.

On Monday, January 10th, the Natick Board of Selectmen endorsed Town Administrator Martha White’s proposal to issue several of the permits to members of the Natick Police Department who run the Boston Marathon®, issue 5-6 of the permits to the Natick Fire Department to be donated to The Michael Carter Lisnow Respite Center in Hopkinton – an organization long supported by Natick Firefighters, and the balance of Natick’s invitational entries being used to support the following causes:

- Bringing the Vietnam Veterans’Memorial Moving Wall™ to Natick this summer www.movingwallnatick.org
- The Healthy Pantry Initiative, a collaboration between the Natick Community Organic Farm www.natickfarm.org and the Natick Service Council www.natickservicecouncil.org

Both of these charities will enable runners to raise tax-deductible donations and the Town of Natick will
work with the selected runners to enable the processing of online (credit card) donations. Details:

- The Marathon entry fee is $300, to be paid by the runner
- The minimum fundraising contribution is $2,500. Runners must guarantee this minimum fundraising level with a credit card.
- All prospective runners must submit a letter of interest no later than 5:00 pm on February 4,
2011. Letters may be hand delivered to the Town Administrator’s office in Natick Town Hall, 2nd floor or submitted by email to Maureen Fleming at mfleming@natickma.org. Letters of interest must include the runner’s name, address and phone number, designation of the charity for which funds will be raised, and indication of the amount of funds you commit to raising for the charity.
- The first five invitational entries will be made available to those runners who guarantee raising the highest total dollar amount for either/both designated charities. So, to guarantee entry into the race, you must include in your letter of interest a dollar figure at, or above, the minimum
$2,500 and be among the five highest bidding fundraisers. You will receive an invitational entry
and will be required to sign a letter of commitment to achieving your bid level of fundraising.
- The remaining invitational entry winners (anticipated to be five or more) will be restricted to
Natick residents and will be determined by lottery. The lottery will be conducted on Monday February 7 at 5:30 p.m. at the Natick Town Hall. Entrants are invited to attend the lottery and winners will be notified after the drawing. In the unlikely event that there is an insufficient number of Natick residents entered in the lottery, the Town Administrator reserves the right to make alternative arrangements.

If you have an interest in seeking an invitational number to the 115th Boston Marathon, please submit your letter of interest to the Town Administrator’s office, Natick Town Hall, or mfleming@natickma.org by no later than Friday, February 4, 2011 by 5:00 p.m. The Town Administrator’s office can be reached at 508-647-6410

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It’s official: Moving Wall comes to Natick
2011 JANUARY 27
by Maureen Sullivan

The Moving Wall, a scale replica of the Vietnam Memorial, will be coming to Natick from June 9-12.

The Wall will be set up at the high school soccer field on West Street, next to Memorial Field.

“It’s a community event,” said Ed Jolley, one of the main organizers. “It’s not just for veterans.”

Committees are being formed to help with all the details, from fundraising to security.

The Moving Wall Committee meets the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at the VFW on West Central Street.

Also, volunteers are needed to help read and record the names on the Wall. So far, about 42,000 names have been recorded, with about 18,000 names left to read.

Those interested in reading and recording may contact Cary Holmes at readnatwall@yahoo.com or call 508-653-2612.

T-shirts and candles are being sold at Jones Drug on Main Street to help offset the costs of bringing the Wall to Natick.

Donations may be sent to Moving Wall-Natick, P.O. Box 162, Natick, MA 01760.

For information, visit www.movingwallnatick.org.

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The Vietnam Moving Wall project will be in Natick, MA from June 9 - 12, 2011, at the Natick High School soccer field on West Street, just beyond the football field on the same side of the street.

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SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS: Moving ideas into action

By Maureen Sullivan
Natick Bulletin and Tab
Jan 21, 2011

"The Moving Wall, a replica of the Vietnam Memorial, is coming to Natick this summer. To help offset expenses, organizers are selling Moving Wall T-shirts and candles at Jones Drug on Main Street. Tax-deductible donations may also be made through www.movingwallnatick.org, or by sending a check to PO Box 162, Natick MA 01760. Also, readers are still needed to record the names on the wall. If interested in prerecording or helping in any other way, contact Cary Holmes at readnatwall@yahoo.com or 508-653-2612. You don’t have to be a veteran to take part."

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SULLIVAN'S TRAVELS: Activity aplenty in Natick center
By Maureen Sullivan
Natick Bulletin and Tab
Sep 17, 2010

"You may have noticed several of them wearing lime green “Moving Wall” T-shirts. That’s because the Wall, a small-scale replica of the Vietnam Memorial, will be coming to Elm Bank next summer. Organizers said that volunteers are needed to read the names of those memorialized on the Wall (volunteers receive a list of 100 names to familiarize themselves with pronunciation, etc.; when they’re ready, volunteers make an appointment with Natick Pegasus to record the names). About 11,000 names have already been recorded, but more volunteers are needed for this, as well as fundraising (they need $50,000), organizing, etc.

The committee bringing the Moving Vietnam Memorial Wall meets on the second Wednesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. at the VFW on West Central Street. Those interested in reading for prerecording, or helping in any other way, may contact Cary Holmes at readnatwall@yahoo.com or call 508-653-2612. You do not have to be a veteran to take part.

Donations may be sent to Moving Wall-Natick, P.O. Box 162, Natick, MA 01760"

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Boston Globe - GLOBE WEST COMMUNITY BRIEFING
May 16, 2010

"VISIT BY VIETNAM MEMORIAL — Plans for hosting the traveling Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall are ongoing, with Ed Jolly, head of the town’s Veterans Council, aiming for a visit in summer 2011. Joining the effort are local veterans and Selectman John Connolly, who proposed the idea. “I hope there is some positive and some healing that will come out of it,’’ said Connolly. The committee has been looking at the Elm Bank Reservation on Route 16 as a possible site. The Moving Wall is a 250-foot-long aluminum and steel version of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C., that carries the names of 58,195 soldiers killed in Vietnam. There are two models that tour the country, and each sponsoring group must raise several thousand dollars to pay for the wall’s transportation, set-up, and maintenance, plus the cost of lighting, staging, and any town services. Connolly said people can send contributions to Moving Wall Natick, PO Box 162, Natick, MA 01760, or volunteer their time in planning or standing vigil at the site. “I’d love to see as many laypeople as possible come out there to help us,’’ he said. Connolly noted that the memorial hits home because most of the soldiers named on it “would only be a few years older than me. They had dreams and goals.’’" — Megan McKee

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The Natick Moving Wall project is under the direction of the Natick Veterans Council.
All donations are tax-deductible. Donations may be made payable to:
The Moving Wall-Natick, P.O. Box 162, Natick, MA 01760

This page was last updated 11 June 2011

The entire contents of this website © 2011 The Natick, MA Veterans Council, All Rights Reserved.
The Moving Wall™ is a trademark of Vietnam Combat Veterans, Ltd. Since 1984, the traveling half-size replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.
No unauthorized duplications allowed.